Used 78' Fender Bandmaster Reverb

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Used 78' Fender Bandmaster Reverb

599.99

1978 Fender Bandmaster Reverb Tube Amp Head

●Fender
●1978
●70 watts
●Reverb
●Tremolo
●Push/Pull Volume Boost
●All Tube Power
●Made in the USA

The 70W model from 1978 with master volume and push/pull boost had a huge power transformer and big filter caps. It reminds us more of a classic 80w Twin Reverb than a Bandmaster Reverb, and it shared its circuit design with the Pro Reverb and Super Reverb at that time.

The silverface Bandmaster Reverb is a typical ab763 amp and shares basic circuit design with the Super Reverb, Deluxe Reverb, Twin Reverb, Vibrolux Reverb, Pro Reverb and Twin Reverb.

The main differences between these amps are transformer size, filter caps size and output/speaker impedance. Yes of course some have the mid knob and bright switch while others don’t. All these ab763 amps with reverb has the gain stage in the reverb recovery circuit which the non-reverb amps don’t have. The reverb amps will start to break up around 4-5 on the volume knob while the non-reverb amps stay clean to approx 6-7. this is caused by the lack of gain stage in the reverb recovery circuit which contributes to tube distortion and compression in the preamp section when the amp is pushed.

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